The Heartbleed Bug

The Heartbleed Bug is a serious vulnerability in the popular OpenSSL cryptographic software library. This weakness allows stealing the information protected, under normal conditions, by the SSL/TLS encryption used to secure the Internet. SSL/TLS provides communication security and privacy over the Internet for applications such as web, email, instant messaging (IM) and some virtual private networks (VPNs).

The Heartbleed bug allows anyone on the Internet to read the memory of the systems protected by the vulnerable versions of the OpenSSL software. This compromises the secret keys used to identify the service providers and to encrypt the traffic, the names and passwords of the users and the actual content. This allows attackers to eavesdrop on communications, steal data directly from the services and users and to impersonate services and users.

What is the CVE-2014-0160?

CVE-2014-0160 is the official reference to this bug. CVE (Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures) is the Standard for Information Security Vulnerability Names maintained by MITRE. Due to co-incident discovery a duplicate CVE, CVE-2014-0346, which was assigned to us, should not be used, since others independently went public with the CVE-2014-0160 identifier.

Why it is called the Heartbleed Bug?

Bug is in the OpenSSL’s implementation of the TLS/DTLS (transport layer security protocols) heartbeat extension (RFC6520). When it is exploited it leads to the leak of memory contents from the server to the client and from the client to the server.

 

Badlock Bug

On April 12th, 2016 Badlock, a crucial security bug in Windows and Samba was disclosed.

Samba 4.4.2, 4.3.8 and 4.2.11 Security Releases are available.

Is there a CVE for Badlock?

Yes. Badlock for Samba is referenced by CVE-2016-2118 (SAMR and LSA man in the middle attacks possible) and for Windows by CVE-2016-0128 / MS16-047 (Windows SAM and LSAD Downgrade Vulnerability).

There are additional CVEs related to Badlock. Those are:

What can attackers gain?

The security vulnerabilities can be mostly categorised as man-in-the-middle or denial of service attacks.

    1. Man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks:
      There are several MITM attacks that can be performed against a variety of protocols used by Samba. These would permit execution of arbitrary Samba network calls using the context of the intercepted user.

      Impact examples of intercepting administrator network traffic:

      • Samba AD server – view or modify secrets within an AD database, including user password hashes, or shutdown critical services.
      • standard Samba server – modify user permissions on files or directories.

 

  1. Denial-of-Service (DoS) attacks:
    Samba services are vulnerable to a denial of service from an attacker with remote network connectivity to the Samba service.

Who is affected?

Affected versions of Samba are:

  • 3.6.x,
  • 4.0.x,
  • 4.1.x,
  • 4.2.0-4.2.9,
  • 4.3.0-4.3.6,
  • 4.4.0

Earlier versions have not been assessed.

How can I fix my systems?

Please apply the patches provided by the Samba Team and SerNet for EnterpriseSAMBA / SAMBA+ immediately.

Patched versions are (both the interim and final security release have the patches):

  • 4.2.10 / 4.2.11,
  • 4.3.7 / 4.3.8,
  • 4.4.1 / 4.4.2.

 

Shellshock

Shellshock, also known as Bashdoor,[1] is a family of security bugs[2] in the widely used Unix Bash shell, the first of which was disclosed on 24 September 2014. Many Internet-facing services, such as some web server deployments, use Bash to process certain requests, allowing an attacker to cause vulnerable versions of Bash to execute arbitrary commands. This can allow an attacker to gain unauthorized access to a computer system.[3]

Stéphane Chazelas contacted Bash’s maintainer, Chet Ramey, on 12 September 2014[1] telling Ramey about his discovery of the original bug, which he called “Bashdoor”. Working together with security experts, he soon had a patch as well.[1] The bug was assigned the CVE identifier CVE-2014-6271.[4] It was announced to the public on 24 September 2014 when Bash updates with the fix were ready for distribution.[5]

 

Specific exploitation vectors

CGI-based web server
When a web server uses the Common Gateway Interface (CGI) to handle a document request, it passes various details of the request to a handler program in the environment variable list. For example, the variable HTTP_USER_AGENT has a value that, in normal usage, identifies the program sending the request. If the request handler is a Bash script, or if it executes one for example using the system(3) call, Bash will receive the environment variables passed by the server and will process them as described above. This provides a means for an attacker to trigger the Shellshock vulnerability with a specially crafted server request.[6]
Security documentation for the widely used Apache web server states: “CGI scripts can … be extremely dangerous if they are not carefully checked.”[22] and other methods of handling web server requests are often used. There are a number of online services which attempt to test the vulnerability against web servers exposed to the Internet.[citation needed]
OpenSSH server
OpenSSH has a “ForceCommand” feature, where a fixed command is executed when the user logs in, instead of just running an unrestricted command shell. The fixed command is executed even if the user specified that another command should be run; in that case the original command is put into the environment variable “SSH_ORIGINAL_COMMAND”. When the forced command is run in a Bash shell (if the user’s shell is set to Bash), the Bash shell will parse the SSH_ORIGINAL_COMMAND environment variable on start-up, and run the commands embedded in it. The user has used their restricted shell access to gain unrestricted shell access, using the Shellshock bug.[23]
DHCP clients
Some DHCP clients can also pass commands to Bash; a vulnerable system could be attacked when connecting to an open Wi-Fi network. A DHCP client typically requests and gets an IP address from a DHCP server, but it can also be provided a series of additional options. A malicious DHCP server could provide, in one of these options, a string crafted to execute code on a vulnerable workstation or laptop.[13]
Qmail server
When using Bash to process email messages (e.g. through .forward or qmail-alias piping), the qmail mail server passes external input through in a way that can exploit a vulnerable version of Bash.[24][25]
IBM HMC restricted shell
The bug can be exploited to gain access to Bash from the restricted shell of the IBM Hardware Management Console,[26] a tiny Linux variant for system administrators. IBM released a patch to resolve this.[27]
Damn Bugs (but we like them)

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